Pella Chronicle

Community News Network

August 1, 2013

Back-to-school shopping likely to be less this year

(Continued)

Almost half of parents consider price to be the most important factor, according to a survey released July 22 by Capital One Financial Corp.

That should benefit Wal-Mart Stores, whose prices were lower than those at Target, Sears' K-Mart and Staples in a Bloomberg Industries pricing survey last week. Bentonville, Ark.-based Wal-Mart's prices on a basket of items were 9.8 percent lower than at Target, 33 percent less than K-Mart and 31 percent cheaper than at Staples, according to the study.

The focus on saving is a contrast to last year, when per- household spending soared 14 percent on pent-up demand. Parents haven't forgotten that splurge and plan to ask their kids to reuse what they can for the coming school year. Indeed, Slaney points out that Tiffany still has skinny jeans that fit.

"Shoppers may need more encouragement and excitement to expand their child's wardrobe or replenish additional items," Alison Paul, a Chicago-based retail sector leader at the Deloitte LLP consulting firm, said in a statement. "Retailers will not only have to make offers very attractive this season, but they will have to score an 'A+' on unique, exclusive merchandise and services that nobody else can offer."

Things would be different if teens had their way. Forty- seven percent of teens expect to do their shopping in department stores and 21 percent identified mobile phones, electronic gadgets and computers as must-haves, Capital One said. Among the parents, the figures were 29 percent and 4 percent, respectively, the McLean, Va.-based bank said.

The younger generation may win in the end. Almost three- quarters of parents say their children influence at least half of their back-to-school purchases, the NRF said. More than two- thirds said they would forgo purchases for themselves to pay for back-to-school merchandise, a Deloitte survey showed.

And the persuasive power of teenagers can't be ignored. Slaney says Tiffany points to pictures in magazines, says all the girls are wearing the clothes she wants and sometimes even resorts to the silent treatment.

"There is ongoing pressure," Slaney says. "She tries everything she can."

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