Pella Chronicle

Opinion

December 17, 2010

Community newspapers continue to show strong readership, community reliance

Pella — Communities served by community newspapers continue to demonstrate heavy reliance upon their local papers for news and information. Seventy-three percent say they read a local newspaper at least once a week.

Readers also say they read most or all of their community newspapers (78 percent), and of those going online for local news, 55 percent found it on the local newspaper’s website, compared to 17 percent for sites such as Yahoo, MSN or Google, and 26 percent for the website of a local TV station.

The results are reported by the National Newspaper Association, which has just completed its fifth readership survey on the patterns of community newspaper readers. Working with the research arm of the Reynolds Journalism Institute at the Missouri School of Journalism, NNA tests reactions of people living in smaller communities served by local newspapers.

Since 2005, NNA has done research on how people read and what they think about their local newspapers. Results have been fairly consistent over the years, though the surveys have focused more tightly on small communities during the five years. For the 2010 survey, readership for towns with newspapers that have circulations of 8,000 or less were sampled. The community size has not significantly affected outcomes. The surveys show that community newspapers have remained popular.

The early data indicate that the positive findings are consistent with the earlier surveys:

-73 percent of those surveyed read a local newspaper each week.

-Those readers, on average, share their paper with 3.34 persons.

-They spend about 37.5 minutes reading their local newspapers.

-78 percent read most or all of their community newspapers.

-41 percent keep their community newspapers six or more days (shelf life).

-62 percent of readers read local news very often in their community newspapers, while 54 percent say they never read local news online (only 9 percent say they read local news very often online).

-39 percent of those surveyed read local education (school) news very often in their newspapers, while 67 percent never read local education news online.

-30 percent read local sports news very often in their newspapers, while 67 percent never read local sports online.

-35 percent read editorials or letters to the editor very often in their newspapers, while 74 percent (nearly three quarters) never read editorials or letters to the editor online.

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